Toilet Training

English
Credit (s)

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course, participants should be able to:

  • Define “Toilet training”
  • Classify Signs of readiness and developmental skills
  • Illustrate variety of training methods
  • Modify training methods for special population
  • Recognize fecal incontinence

Intended Audience:

This online course is designed for pediatricians, family physicians, and pediatric nurses.

Abstract:

Toilet training is considered a major developmental milestone to families worldwide. It is the “mastery of skills necessary for urinating and defecating in a socially acceptable time and manner.” The age at which a child is fully trained varies significantly across the globe, depending on the socioeconomic and cultural differences. All practicing providers should be aware of readiness signs and possible impacts of developmental delays or disabilities on achievement of full continence. There are a couple of widely accepted methods of toilet training across the western countries. However, there is no one perfect method and often families will have to be patient and use trial and error as they navigate a variety of obstacles, such as incontinence, constipation, among others. Providers should feel comfortable counseling parents about diet, physical activity, medications, and behavioral therapy methods that can aid in achieving toilet training success.

Assessment and Earning CME Credit:

To receive CME credit for this episode in Armenia, you must take the CME quiz at the end of this course. You have 3 chances to get a 70% to pass. Once you pass the quiz, we will send your information to the Armenian Ministry of Health for credits.

Dr. Tamar Nazerian Chorbadjian

Dr. Tamar Nazerian Chorbadjian

Toilet training is considered a major developmental milestone for families worldwide. It is the "mastery of skills necessary for urinating and defecating in a socially acceptable time and manner." The age at which a child is fully trained varies significantly across the globe, depending on socioeconomic and cultural differences. All practicing providers should be aware of readiness signs and possible impacts of developmental delays or disabilities on achievement of full continence. There are a couple of widely accepted methods of toilet training across Western countries. However, there is no one perfect method, and often, families will have to be patient and use trial and error as they navigate a variety of obstacles, such as incontinence and constipation, among others. Providers should feel comfortable counseling parents about diet, physical activity, medications, and behavioral therapy methods that can aid in achieving toilet training success.